Not Teaching Anymore?

Here’s a post from an adjunct professor who quit. Her story isn’t unique. It’s becoming increasingly common.

James Pilant

From the web site, Bryn Greenwood

http://bryngreenwood.wordpress.com/2013/09/19/why-i-dont-teach-anymore/

Unfortunately, I don’t teach anymore. I made the decision to become a full-time secretary primarily because of an environment like the one described in this Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article, which details the downward spiral of Margaret Mary Vojtko, a long-time adjunct professor. Her poverty eventually led to her death, so I feel lucky that mine merely led to a secretarial job.

Universities increasingly rely on underpaid adjunct faculty to carry the burden of what are dismissed as “entry level” courses. It seems to escape university administrators and many tenured faculty members that those entry level courses matter the most. Those are the classes where freshmen get a firm footing for the courses they will take in the next three years. Underpaying the people who teach first-year college students seems equivalent to systematically paying first grade teachers less than sixth grade teachers. After all, teaching kids to read, that’s just entry level work. Easy.

Yet those same tenured faculty lament how many students arrive in their upper level courses without the most basic research skills. Why? Because the people tasked with teaching them basic skills – the underpaid adjunct faculty – do not have the time, energy, or institutional support to become truly great teachers. Some of them are teaching four courses per regular semester and two courses per summer semester (compared to the average tenured faculty load of two/two/zero for an academic year.) At the typical pay of $3,000-$3,500 per course, an adjunct is lucky to make $30,000 a year, teaching as many as ten courses per year.

Please go to her web site and read the entire post. JP

From Online Ph.D Programs
From Online Ph.D Programs

One thought on “Not Teaching Anymore?

  1. Pingback: Pilant's Business Ethics » Blog Archive Exploitation More and More Prevalent in Higher Education » Pilant's Business Ethics

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